Thursday, 11 November 2010

G20 In Gwanghwamun

F  rom the Nanoomi Party: I liked the bathroom.
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There's a lot happening because of the G20.  I haven't been down to COEX, but my favorite iteration of the G20 so far is this one:

The cute older folks holding up signs are cute...

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 but I LOVED the stuffed creatures:

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Finally, I don't know what this guy's deal was, but I'm sure glad he drove by while I had my camera out.
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In other news: ATEK sent out an e-mail recently:

Recently, some of you have received messages from your countries’ embassies regarding the approaching G20 Seoul Summit (November 11-12). These bulletins have cautioned that often, G20 meetings are accompanied by demonstrations, and extra police security, in different parts of the city. Previous G20 Summits have been met with demonstrations in their host cities, including outbreaks of violence.
To begin with, in Seoul, please be prepared for restrictions on pedestrian and driving traffic around the COEX complex around the time of the summit, from November 11-12, and before and after. Also, prepare for transportation delays if you live or work in that area.
Also, at the last major demonstrations in Seoul, the 2008 U.S. Beef/FTA protests, an English teacher was injured during a demonstration, not for provoking the police, but for being in the wrong place at the wrong time, during an outbreak of violence. ATEK would like to alert English teachers in Seoul to use common sense in the COEX area, where the conference will be held, as well as around City Hall and downtown Seoul. Please exercise caution and around large gatherings, or areas of increased police presence.
ATEK has sent communications to the Seoul Metropolitan Police Agency expressing our confidence that police officers will do their utmost to ensure the safety of English teachers caught up in protest sites, whether out of curiosity or intent to demonstrate.
However, we would also like to inform ATEK’s non-Korean members of parts 2 and 3 of Article 17 in The Immigration Control Act (see source here) which states,
(2) No foreigner sojourning in the Republic of Korea shall engage in any political activity with the exception of cases as provided by this Act or other statutes[1]
(3) If a foreigner sojourning in the Republic of Korea is engaged in any political activity, the Minister of Justice may order him in writing to suspend such activity or may take other necessary measures.
Please exercise prudence in the type and level of involvement you choose, if you attend demonstrations. Do this for your own physical safety, and also because the Immigration Control Act indicates the possibility of consequences for political action: this could put your working visa in jeopardy. Please make informed decisions about participating in demonstrations, and be aware of the situation at demonstrations, even if you are only there out of curiosity, to observe or take pictures.
For more information about your rights, and how to act during an assembly or demonstration, the NGO (Non-Governmental Organization) MINBYUN, or “Lawyers for a Democratic Society,” has published two document, titled the “G20 Summit Manuals for Foreign Activists,” and "Demonstrating the G20 in Seoul this November?" which provides information about Korean laws and codes regarding assemblies and demonstrations. If you plan on attending demonstrations, either for observation or participation, we recommend looking through these two documents. First point: do not participate in violence.
If you are not a Korean, please also consider registering with your embassy, to be updated on important news or alerts concerning citizens of your country.
Following are some embassy websites (if your embassy is not listed below, you will likely find it here:
Australia: http://www.southkorea.embassy.gov.au/seol/home.html
Canada: http://www.canadainternational.gc.ca/korea-coree/index.aspx
Ireland: http://www.dfa.ie/home/index.aspx?id=44447
India: http://www.indembassy.or.kr/
Indonesia: http://www.indonesiaseoul.org/indexs.php
Nepal: http://www.nepembseoul.gov.np/en/
New Zealand: http://www.nzembassy.com/korea
Philippines: http://www.philembassy-seoul.com/
South Africa: http://www.southafrica-embassy.or.kr/eng/index_eng.php
United Kingdom: http://ukinrok.fco.gov.uk/en/
USA: http://seoul.usembassy.gov/
Other embassy websites: http://korea4expats.com/Embassies-service.html

Finally, just in case you were wondering:

Wifeoseyo's dogs like me.  And I like them.
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2 comments:

The Seoul Searcher said...

From the looks of that motorcycle guy he wants to show the world that Dokdo belongs to Korea. Too bad nobody will understand him if they don't already speak Korean...

Foreigner Joy said...

You are looking too hairless Rob. hmph!